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Blog Entry

H2H vs. Rotisserie...

Posted on: April 30, 2009 1:30 pm
 
   I am starting this blog entry to spark a friendly debate between players who favor one method of scoring over the other.

For my taste H2H is for casual players who like nothing more than to hear themselves talk (smack talk) and Roto scoring is for the hard core player who really wants to test their knowledge and skill.  No offense to you H2H junkies, I have done both kinds of leagues for multiple years in multiple sports, and H2H just doesn't compare.  But hey, that is just one guys opinion. 

What's yours?
Category: Fantasy Baseball
Tags: H2H, Rotisserie, Roto
 
Comments

Since: May 24, 2011
Posted on: June 2, 2011 11:18 am
 

H2H vs. Rotisserie...

Roto Baseball is money. It is what started everything fantasy. As the saying goes, roto baseball is the best thing that has happened to baseball fans since baseball. From what I've read on here, it sounds like pretty much everyone is in agreement. Leave H2H for football, even though the idea of roto football is very intriguing to me.

For a sport like baseball - 6-month season, 162 games - H2H just doesn't make sense. The best team loses A LOT. It's like the BCS. In roto, where every AB and inning pitched of the season matters, the champion of the league is ALWAYS the best team. There's no hinding behind meaningless W-L record or getting screwed when Albert Pujols goes 4-26 in a week with 2 RBI and 0 HR while Corey Hart or someone else of lesser talent hits 4 of his 20 HR that same week. Or Roy Halladay gives up 5 ER in his one start/week when Livan Hernandez throws a shutout. There's no question who the better player is over a full season, but those weeks can certainly cost you in H2H.

H2H just makes no sense for fantasy baseball. Got to have aggregate scoring throughout the WHOLE SEASON in order to determine the best team in the league, not just who's been hot the last 3 weeks during the playoffs.



Since: May 10, 2011
Posted on: May 10, 2011 11:22 pm
 

H2H vs. Rotisserie...

yeah your right about head to head vs rotiss formats, for me i play both types of leagues and enjoy them both but rotiss is more challenging and competitve and takes much more analysis and research to win and be successful, to me winning a rotiss league is 10 timees sweeter than a h2h league



Since: Jan 21, 2009
Posted on: February 9, 2010 1:20 pm
 

H2H vs. Rotisserie...

Yes Claudiomni.  You will need to set up a league by purchasing the 'Commissioner league' type which is not free but it is easy to do Keeper Leagues thru CBS. 



Since: Feb 8, 2010
Posted on: February 8, 2010 7:29 pm
 

H2H vs. Rotisserie...

On CBS you can create a Keeper league baseball please answer me?



Since: Jan 21, 2009
Posted on: February 1, 2010 12:39 pm
 

H2H vs. Rotisserie...

Either format can be fun and it is always "what you make it".  As I and many others have already touched on though with H2H there is too much luck involved.  If you haven't been beaten by luck or should I say bad luck yet frisagoat than you haven't been playing long enough.  That's not meant to be a knock on you but you can't seriously think or say that the right person wins all the time in H2H.  It just doesn't work out that way.  Now some people enjoy that part of it and that is their opinion and everyone can prefer whatever they want to about each format.  Just don't try to convince me that luck doesn't play much of a role in H2H. 



Since: Jan 23, 2010
Posted on: January 30, 2010 7:19 pm
 

H2H vs. Rotisserie...

I'm currently in both types.  I think the typical knock on head to head is that it's about talking trash to your friends... So what???

The league I'm in we have salaries, weekly changes, unless there's and injury and auction style add/drop.  Most of the idea was to fun up roto.  Also, if you're a hardcore player you're going to win either way.  It's nice that CBS has custom reports and if you check the stats, it's usually pretty close to the same standings you'd get if it were a roto league.

The other thing I see about H2H is that everyone is more engaged, which leads to more trading.

I like both ways, but if you make your H2H league a salary/keeper league with a group of people that aren't going anywhere, it beats roto any day.



Since: Jan 21, 2009
Posted on: January 12, 2010 5:31 pm
 

H2H vs. Rotisserie...

Great stuff Varrys. All valid points/observations.  The luck factor was probably my biggest gripe with H2H.  I hated nothing more than putting together a fantastic season leading in points categories and often record as well to be upset in the playoffs. 

One point you touched on that I never like but have come to almost accept more recently is abandoned teams.  Unless you are in a league like Master Jeff eluded to it almost always is bound to happen that someone mails it in for at least the last month.  Some of the best leagues I have taken part in still are home to owners who mentally check out due to position for some period of time.  It usually is never as bad as those owners who "ghost" a team for the entire 2nd half but like death and taxes I have come to the conclusion that in some way shape or form it is always going to pop up.  Some feel there is more teams abandoned in roto leagues than in H2H leagues.  However the way I see it is that those abandoned teams in roto while they can make a slight difference in standings they do not effect the league overall as much as dead teams in H2H.  I can provide examples if necessary but for now I will leave it at that statement.

Thanks for posting.  I have seen you Varrys and Master Jeff a good amount on these boards and value your opinions and input.  Great posts from the rest as well.  Everyone made knowledgable posts.  That's not always the case with some of the characters on these boards. 

Nice point about daily lineups versus weekly lineups and knowing the commitment level of your league owners Master Jeff.  Very applicable info.

As the 2010 Baseball season approaches I will be getting back in here more and I'll be putting up some good stuff for us to debate.  Thanks Everyone.

Brick19




Since: Jan 12, 2007
Posted on: December 2, 2009 12:13 pm
 

H2H vs. Rotisserie...

I actually enjoy both leagues equally. I've won H2H and points leagues, and I've had several top-3 finishes in Roto. I'm not picking one or the other, but I'm going to throw out my random observations.

--I do hate the extreme 2-start pitching streaming that happens in weekly leagues. Yes, different scoring systems have been created to help diffuse it, but it's simply annoying. Drafting quality should be more important than quantity, no matter the format. That's one reason I enjoy the Roto leagues.

--Luck is a factor in H2H, and it annoys some people immensely. I've lost championships becuase of it myself. But some argue it's more "realistic" because you never know who's going to have a good week in real baseball (and in the postseason, cough-Cubs-cough). By diving into the stats available, there's a way to minimize risk in weekly H2H, which can give you an advantage and help you beat out the really random managers who don't pay attention. But luck won't be tamed, and you can still win or lose because of something out of your control.

--I hate abandoned teams, and I know people blame Roto for that, because after July about half of the teams are out of the running. But isn't that true in H2H too? If you enter August with a 2-8 record, there's no way you're making the playoffs either. In a pay league, people often give up. If it's an all-friends league, then you can play the role of spoiler, but even so it's not like you'll win. I see just as many abanoned teams in H2H as Roto. The nice thing is that in H2H, the best record isn't always the champion, like in real baseball. But teams in the cellar are still not likely going to enjoy themselves, no matter the format.

--I really enjoy points leagues over standard 5x5 H2H leagues. I've had four closers get one save total for the week, and the other team has one guy who gets three, so you lose in the category for the week. Points make everything equal, though obviously sluggers are still valued over speedsters. But I like math, and seeing everything turned into a common unit really helps in evaluating talent and performances, especially when you're in a custom league where CBS's pre-rankings for their points leagues don't apply.

So that's my food for thought. I'm sure I'll have more points later, especially after I read everyone's posts.



Since: Oct 27, 2006
Posted on: December 1, 2009 4:16 pm
 

H2H vs. Rotisserie...

I think this or any other decision boils down to weather or not you are putting together a casual league, a fanatics league or anything in between. Any modifiable characteristic of league construction can be set up to better suit one or the other. This decision can help maintain balance in a league in a way that most people do not take into account. Let me explain through personal experience.

When I first started playing fantasy baseball I worked as a software engineer and had one child. Because of these factors I had around the clock access to my team and news updates. Just about everyone in the league had similar circumstances. In this situation daily updates worked great for me because I could make moves at any time of the day. After changing jobs I work as a supermarket manager for a chain that does not allow web access from work, and when I get home I have four kids to help take care of. After that I was handicapped in that league because everyone else in the league would see updates and makes moves long before I had the opportunity.

If everyone in a league is fanatic and has constant access then daily moves make everyone pay more attention and be more active. If not everyone has constant access then some will be at a disadvantage, so it is important to make sure prospective owners understand this before they get involved.

If you league allows it, I prefer the combination of daily lineup changes and weekly roster moves that are always based on waiver priority. This stops the one guy who is in front of a computer all day from dominating the waiver wire while giving owners the freedom to micro-manage their team's production.



Since: Jun 18, 2008
Posted on: June 5, 2009 12:56 pm
 

H2H vs. Rotisserie...

I currently have 7 fantasy baseball teams and have been doing them religiously for many years. Of those 7, 1 is H2H while the other 6 are roto, and i have always enjoyed the roto leagues more despite being first place in the H2H. Roto takes a lot more time and effort, you must keep up with it since scoring and stats accumulate over the whole season and dont open and close on a week by week basis. Also you are competing against everyone everyday instead of one person at a time, making it much more competitively balanced and fair, considering if one week you have the 2nd lowest point total but are fortunate to be playing the only team to have less points than you that week. In this case, you get rewarded just the same as whoever scored the most points that period.

Rotisserrie allows you to take chances on guys and really get into the economics of baseball and statistical scarcity and allows you to use much more strategy when picking which players to put in the lineup. It is because of this that the intense daily baseball fan will always choose roto leagues over H2H, because their extra knowledge of the game and players give them advantage over the casual fan who doesn't do their lineups constantly throughout the season.

In rotisserie leagues it becomes highly valuable to know things such as the fact that Brad Bergesen averages 1.6 walks per 9 innings, because if you are trying to lower your WHIP you will definitely want to target guys with outstanding numbers like that. In H2H you wouldn't care about all the finer points such as this, you might simply base who you are starting based on their opponent as to increase your chances to get a W and thus the points, which only count for one period anyways.


The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com